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industry. i was just wondering if you would talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russian -- russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wondered if you'd just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons, and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy for us which is to climb this our car and head to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no question about that.
is good or bad about the current environment, we need to look not just at what we have lost or gamed compared to broadcast news but what we lost or gamed compared to the era of realism in the 19th century or the partisan press, in the late 18th century. or the progress receive era. so, we have really gone through these changes before, and the issue in front of us is not, is it good or bad? what's good about it, and what's bad, and how to maintain what is good and limit what is bad. >> host: let's go to the historical set of your book. what have we lost in this new era as opposed to the abc, nbc, cbs era. which is an era. >> guest: i think we lost significant things -- i should say lost -- you made the point that we have been talking about this for 20 years, we are style transitioning so those stations, those news networks still exist. but when we lived in an era, which we did in the '50s and ' 0s, and all the way up to the '90s where we as a society, wees a citizens, believed that if we watched the local news and then the national news, an hour or so period in the early evening, that
environment to another, what environment was the environment she was going to that caused the permit change? do you think that it was a culture thing from that environment? if so, can you elaborate more on the culture that she had -- that had changed her personality and what you think needs to be done? >> guest: yeah, you know, well, what happened was that when my father came here to the united states, my mother was left with us back in mexico, and she had to suffer, you know, the way a lot of wives suffer when they see their husbands go to another country, and there was a fear of being forgotten, abandoned, him finding another woman while he's gone. this was a fear that my mother had every single day about my father finding himself another woman here in the u.s., and forgetting about us and about her so she had to deal with this every single day, and when my father sent for her, it was such an amazing moment for her to feel wanted, to feel that her husband actually needed her by his side, and this is why she came because shemented to make sure that she could protect her marriage, that she
. for the environment. there's no question about that. fortunately in russia they don't have an environment. at least they have frequently behaviored as though they didn't have an environment. and certainly the oil industry has never meant particular -- been particularly concerned about the environment. i remember in the 1990s talking to the minister of the environmental science. he happened to be briefly also the ministry of agreology. i met him in the huge office. there were maps that showed radio active tam contamination. he was interesting. and id asked him about the environment. he said we don't have one. we can't afford one. it was very much the story of the 1990s. the signature of the russian hydrocarbon industry is very brief. it's absolutely conventional up to this point. and their investment in renewable and unconventionals is at this point. [inaudible] with one big exception in the nuclear power. they consider that to be a virtuous renewable. as for solar, well, the agency in charge of solar-power development is coordinated to the nuclear power agency which is tells you something. and so o
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root and was, essentially, you know, became more or and more vir you lent. there were a number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya would in retrospect signal a, you know, to people who were watching this that things were not going well in libya, that essentially the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be, to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was the pass kerr in -- massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head of -- under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. and the east, you know, in a very tightly-knit tribal society an act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi, basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment a
unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyw
because of the environment offered. the first thing interurban competitiveness for community competitiveness is where do people want to be and he's moving cities. every city i work in, they want to attract engines of lunch premiership. 64% in favor they want to live, then they moved their look for a job. 77% say they want to live in america's urban cores. why? and massive cultural shift. when i was young, one out of 1219-year-olds opted out of getting their drivers license. now it's one out of four. the tv shows, chris weinberger asked me, what tv shows teach you watch growing up as an approaching 50? i watch rady bunch, partridge family, gilligan's island, all suburban tv shows. there is hawaii five o come was hawaii 50, streets of san francisco, crime television shows in the city. and of course there was lucille ball and the honeymooners for the city on this presence outside the light well of the kitchen dining. we took the kids -- what did the millennial screw up watching? friends, "seinfeld" and sex in the city. i grew up in the suburbs and they grew up in the suburbs, bu
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
, democracy and the new information environment. but it seems that for the last 20-30 years we half been debating the after broadcast news scenario. how do you assess it? >> guest: well, what we're trying to do in this book is put it into a little brit of historical context. so our basic argument is that over the last 20 years, there have been a number of changes, some slow, some more quick -- that are changing the way in which we think about where we get public affairs information from. and the three big changes we think are going on are the blurring of news and entertainment -- thank the daily show, although it's more than that. the blurring of producers and consumers, and the
's because it is something we can do about, and the things we are doing to the environment are making these things more unbearable. for example, construction. soon after the earthquake in haiti was an earthquake in chile that was slightly on a level higher that killed less than 100 people, fewer than 100 people. we are a city of buildings and all these things and people have been forced to leave the countryside to come to the city to work and you have this dense population. we often discuss these things and how you version, the land, the fact we have to bring the trees for charcoal causes us to have these massive amount play and flooding. so these things are things we can do something about is a community. they get repeated more, that these other theories also talked about. >> host: and reading through "so spoke the earth," i was struck by the fact that so many writers here and in a sense to return. >> guest: i think so many of us come his children. it's different when you don't choose your migrations. we were like i've parents who fell like they had no choice but to leave. so you do
use in the academic environment. as some of you know, three of our member publishers sued georgia state university because when georgia state moved its from printed course packs as materials for higher education courses to e-reserves, they made another change. they stopped paying a penny for anything put up on e-reserves no matter how, how long it was. and since 2006 not a penny has been paid. and because georgia state was, in the view of publishers, an outlier in that respect because we have understood and we think many people have understood that copyright is agnostic or same rules would apply whether we're talking print or digital, that's what led to this particular litigation. and i would say that there this -- we know there's all this vagueness and difficult any the deciding what is fair use. and you can run through four factors, but the bottom line, this is hard to figure out in many cases. but some cases are clearer than others. in the cases where large amounts of material are being used semester after semester after semester not paid for if any amount no matter how long th
extent. the uncertainty of it all fascinated me, as does my environment, just by nature. so the book ends up being very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth, and how over time, it changes. the same substance, stone, rock, water, wood, guess from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat, and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality, all the way. from childhood lower, immortal, to our elder years, where we become the archive, where we become the thing which holds so many people we have lost and is what survives. memory is what survives, and within that memory, the afterlife of so much. so, thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago i certainly did not expect i would end up here, or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think everything we have heard so far is a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never h
and one is to mr. dove -- when no one of your main arguments is that it's a good environment for negotiations of a similar situation, describing 2004. now, i want to know in light of all the -- that we have heard the government perceived by the taliban and the u.s. is pulling for the americans why would you say that the americans -- to talabani's in a situation -- [inaudible] could you please elaborate more and the other question is that in passing i heard something about india and iran. i would like to hear some more on that to see whether iran and india together or individually have any role in the play as you'll discuss. thank you very much. >> hi, katie from the department of state. you kind of reference the growth of ttp to the lack of support received by the pakistani civilian law-enforcement bodies. i wanted to see if you could kindly clarify whether the support you are looking for there was financial or domestic, political will and why do you think that support is provided to you? >> the gentleman behind. >> hi. i'm with the u.s. -- religious freedom. the role of reli
the aerial spraying, fumigation, we destroyed millions of acres of coca and rain forest environment. one of the most by a diverse countries and the world, literally scorching the years. but what are politicians don't talk about is that colombia is bigger than texas and california combined. the same is true bolivia and peru. a very large land masses. trying to eradicate is like trying to wage a war on dandelions in the united states. good luck. it's not possible. nonetheless, after 12 years of spraying and just merciless onslaught of eradication, 12 years ago 90 percent of cocaine in the united states originated from columbia. after a dozen years of intense drug war in colombia, today about 95 percent of u.s. cocaine originates from columbia. whereas less than 1 percent originally from bolivia. oblivion's actually have done much better in terms of eradication, interdiction of cocaine transiting through peru to brazil and argentina and other countries. also, they have captured and seized more of that than previous governments that were very subservient to u.s. interest. so by any objective
good for the environment were now being planted from fence row to fence row. so by 1999 the price of corn was 50% above 1996 levels. i'm sorry, 50% below 1996 levels, and soy was down 41%. and farmers were in really major economic distress. is so there was all sorts of pressure on congress to do something. food industry lobbying meant that the policymakers didn't go back and address these problems by reinstating some supply management provisions. instead, congress used taxpayer money to keep farmers afloat so they wouldn't be putting pressure if rural areas on -- in rural areas on their members of congress. so these emergency payments were instituted in 1998. the payments were made permanent in the 2002 farm bill, and that that's how the subsidy system was born. so who are the main beneficiaries of this kind of subsidy system? it's really the food and the meat industry and the grain traders who are the winners. deregulation saves them money by allowing them to pay farmers less for their crops than it costs to produce those crops. so it's not the subsidies themselves that are actua
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15